Leak in Alabama pipeline affecting Savannah area drivers, at least in terms of price

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SAVANNAH, Ga. – A major leak in a pipeline in Alabama is causing some issues for Georgia drivers in terms of supply and prices.

AAA’s Garrett Townsend tells us that prices statewide have increased in the past week but that Savannah area prices should still be “about $2.13 per gallon for regular unleaded.”

We found prices a  Pooler station just under that at $2.12 and Paul Weber was filling his tank but told us he’s not too concerned.  “It should be fine in a week or so as long as we have gasoline,” he told me.

But up the street at Pooler Parkway we found one Shell station with gas priced at $2.39 per gallon.  Marcy Packer was traveling was Massachusetts and was a little shocked.  “”I guess somebody might be gouging a little bit maybe,” she told me.

There can be reasons why prices vary including transportation costs.  Townsend says price variation is not always price gouging. “But when you find those that are significantly higher particularly ones without explanation, and its price sticks out as much higher than other stations around,then that gives an opportunity to look into it and investigate it,” he said.

The Georgia Attorney General’s office is encouraging people to report any concerns they have by filling out a form on its website.

Georgia residents who suspect gouging can also call 1-800-869-1123 or visit the Georgia Department of Law Consumer Protection Unit here.

The leak in the pipeline affected up to six states including Georgia and Colonial Pipeline Company is now in the process of building a temporary pipeline. While some shortages have been reported in the Atlanta area, we are told that in Coastal Georgia, supply problems are not anticipated.

“But once they do get the temporary pipeline operating  and everything gets back to normal, then we should expect those gas prices to decline,” said Townsend.

Meanwhile, Governor Deal is asking Georgians not to top their tanks saying we should “maintain regular consumption and travel levels.”

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