PHOTOS: Hurricane Katrina – Then and Now

Credit: Mario Tama
Credit: Mario Tama
PORT SULPHUR, LA – MAY 16, 2015: (TOP PHOTO) The cemetery outside Saint Patrick’s Church stands in Plaquemines Parish on May 16, 2015 in Port Sulphur, Louisiana. The tenth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, which killed at least 1836 and is considered the costliest natural disaster in U.S. history, is August 29. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
PORT SULPHUR, LA – SEPTEMBER 11, 2005: (BOTTOM PHOTO) Water floods an above-ground cemetery outside Saint Patrick’s Church in Plaquemines Parish September 11, 2005 in Port Sulphur, Louisiana. (Photos by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
Credit: Mario Tama
NEW ORLEANS, LA – MAY 12, 2015: (TOP PHOTO) A school bus drops off a student in front of the Claiborne Bridge in the Lower Ninth Ward on May 12, 2015 in New Orleans, Louisiana. The neighborhood was devastated by flooding from Hurricane Katrina. The tenth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, which killed at least 1836 and is considered the costliest natural disaster in U.S. history, is August 29. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
NEW ORLEANS, LA – AUGUST 31, 2005: (BOTTOM PHOTO) Two men paddle in high water after Hurricane Katrina devastated the area August 31, 2005 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Devastation is widespread throughout the city with water approximately 12 feet high in some areas. Hundreds are feared dead and thousands were left homeless in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida by the storm. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
Credit: Mario Tama
NEW ORLEANS, LA – MAY 12, 2015: (TOP PHOTO) Houses stand in the 7th ward on May 12, 2015 in New Orleans, Louisiana. The tenth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, which killed at least 1836 and is considered the costliest natural disaster in U.S. history, is August 29. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
NEW ORLEANS, LA – SEPTEMBER 06, 2005: (BOTTOM PHOTO) Robert Fontaine walks past a burning house fire in the 7th ward September 6, 2005 in New Orleans, Louisiana. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
Credit: Mario Tama
NEW ORLEANS, LA – MAY 18, 2015: (TOP PHOTO) A man bikes past the corner of Flood Street and St. Claude Avenue in the Lower Ninth Ward on May 18, 2015 in New Orleans, Louisiana. The tenth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, which killed at least 1836 and is considered the costliest natural disaster in U.S. history, is August 29. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
:NEW ORLEANS, LA – AUGUST 31, 2005: (BOTTOM PHOTO) Men ride in a boat in high water past Flood Street after Hurricane Katrina devastated the area August 31, 2005 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Devastation is widespread throughout the city with water approximately 12 feet high in some areas. Hundreds are feared dead and thousands were left homeless in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida by the storm. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

 

Credit: Mario Tama
NEW ORLEANS, LA – MAY 16, 2015: (TOP PHOTO)- A woman walks with a dog in the Lower Ninth Ward on May 16, 2015 in New Orleans, Louisiana. The tenth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, which killed at least 1,836 people and is considered the costliest natural disaster in U.S. history, is August 29. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
NEW ORLEANS – AUGUST 31, 2005: (BOTTOM PHOTO) A man rides in a canoe in high water after Hurricane Katrina devastated the area August 31, 2005 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Devastation is widespread throughout the city with water approximately 12 feet high in some areas. Hundreds are feared dead and thousands were left homeless in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida by the storm. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

(NBC News)  Hurricane Katrina’s fury was felt across the Gulf Coast.  Now, ten years later, the dramatic images are still etched in our nation’s memory.

Dozens of communities from Florida through Louisiana were pounded by the winds, or washed away by the surge as the Category Three hurricane made landfall, but the full magnitude of the storm wasn’t clear until a day or so later when the force of the water unexpectedly overwhelmed levees across New Orleans.

More than 1,800 people were killed and more than 100,000 lost their homes.

In the hardest hit areas, like St. Bernard Parish and the Ninth Ward, survivors were pulled from rooftops by helicopters and boats.  Others walked out, carrying any belongings they could.

Tens of thousands rushed to the Convention Center and Superdome, shelters of “last resort.”

Ten years later the dome has been transformed from a shelter back to a showcase, hosting the men’s Final Four and a Super Bowl.  Bourbon Street and the French Quarter are booming, and so is business.  Forbes recently ranked New Orleans as the fastest growing city in the United States.  But things haven’t moved as quickly in the battered ninth ward.

The federal government has provided $9 billion in funds for rebuilding through the Road Home program and there are still millions of dollars in FEMA money that’s targeted specifically for the Ninth Ward, but what you’ll see when you drive through the neighborhood are hundreds of properties untouched for ten years.

Read more: http://nbcnews.to/1JjMgnQ

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